In Conversation: On Loss and Lessons Learned From the Parkland Tragedy

In Find the Helpers: What 9/11 and Parkland Taught Me About Recovery, Purpose, and Hope, Fred Guttenberg writes of his journey since his daughter Jaime’s murder in the Stoneman Douglas High […]


In Conversation: On Loss and Lessons Learned From the Parkland Tragedy

Authors:Neal Katyal, Fred Guttenberg


In Find the Helpers: What 9/11 and Parkland Taught Me About Recovery, Purpose, and Hope, Fred Guttenberg writes of his journey since his daughter Jaime’s murder in the Stoneman Douglas High School shooting of 2018 in Parkland, Florida, and how he has been able to get through the absolute worst of times, thanks in no small part to the kindness and compassion of others.

Now a gun control activist, Guttenberg is speaking with attorney Neal Katyal, Georgetown University Law Center professor and author of Impeach: The Case Against Donald Trump, in which Katyal, former Acting Solicitor General of the United States, made the case removing our 45th president from office.

Neal Katyal

Neal Katyal served as Acting Solicitor General of the United States (the government’s top courtroom lawyer). He has argued 39 cases before the Supreme Court, more than any minority attorney  in U.S. history. He teaches law at Georgetown University and is a partner at a law firm where he leads one of the largest U.S. Supreme Court practices in the nation. He is a frequent contributor to MSNBC and the New York Times and has appeared on virtually every major American news program. No one is above the law. This belief is as American as freedom of speech and turkey on Thanksgiving—held sacred by Democrats and Republicans alike. But as Neal Katyal argues in Impeach: The Case Against Donald Trump (Mariner Books) that if this President is not held accountable for repeatedly asking foreign powers to interfere in the 2020 presidential election, this could very well mark the end of our democracy. To quote President George Washington’s Farewell Address: “Foreign influence is one of the most baneful foes of republican government.” Impeachment should always be our last resort, explains Katyal, but our founders, our principles, and our Constitution leave us with no choice but to impeach President Trump—before it’s too late. The Washington Post called it “As concise and evenhanded a summation of the accusations currently weighing on the president (and the nation) as one can find between two covers.”

Fred Guttenberg

Fred Guttenberg, spent a decade in sales and management with Johnson & Johnson, followed by almost fifteen years as an entrepreneur, having built a business including nineteen Dunkin Donuts. He began his public life after the murder of his beautiful fourteen-year-old daughter Jaime in the Parkland, Florida, school shooting on Feb 14, 2018. Four months prior to the murder of his daughter, Fred’s brother Michael, one of the original first responders at the World Trade Center, passed away in October 2017 from cancer. Following his involvement in these two distinctly American tragedies, Fred has traveled the country talking about both events but also talking about perspective, perseverance, and resilience. Fred and his wife Jennifer began a nonprofit organization dedicated to Jaime’s life called “Orange Ribbons for Jaime.” It is now his full-time mission. Bradley Whitford is an American film and television actor, political writer and activist. On Valentine’s Day 2018 thirty-four people were shot at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. Jaime Guttenberg was the second-to-last victim. That she and so many of her fellow students were struck down in cold blood galvanized many to action, including Jaime’s father Fred who became an activist dedicated to passing common sense gun safety legislation. In Find the Helpers: What 9/11 and Parkland Taught Me about Recovery, Purpose, and Hope (Mango) Guttenberg writes of his journey since Jaime’s death and how he has been able to get through the worst of times thanks to the kindness and compassion of others. The title refers to a bit of advice by Mr. Rogers: “Always look for the helpers. There will always be helpers. Because if you look for the helpers, you’ll know there’s hope.”